Summertime Sippers to Beat the Heat

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Curious as to why Chinese Medicine practitioners recommend against icy cold drinks on hot days? Check out this article I wrote a few years ago explaining it - plus a few recipes for my fave summer sippers!

As acupuncturists and herbalists, we like to offer alternatives to standard American or Western practices for ‘beating the heat’ that are not health promoting - icy cold drinks, that American favorite, come to mind. Access to refrigeration and summertime ice cubes is relatively recent. Before the Big Gulp with Ice, traditional summertime beverages helped to hydrate us after sweating and balance our bodies to feel more at ease in the heat. But why do TCM practitioners recommend avoiding a giant icy drink? When the body is very warm, dumping ice cold into the system causes a shock - if you've every had an upset stomach after downing a freezing drink on a hot day, or had loose stools or a headache after snowcones, ice cream or other super cold foods, you've felt the effects. Very cold foods can have a milder long term effect on the digestive system too - the digestive system is like a fire, and very cold foods make it harder to get a good flame going. (Read the NPR article linked at the bottom of this post for the modern science behind avoiding cold drinks).

Why not try these tasty treats!?

Mint and Chrysanthemum Tea: Bo he and ju hua are a classic pairing for heat and wind - great for the kind of dry heat that makes allergies flare up. It has a pleasant taste that’s palatable to most people - a little sweetening with stevia leaf, honey or rock sugar makes it even easier to drink. It’s also delicious cool.

Green Tea with Hibiscus: This is a great iced coffee or iced tea substitute as the green tea provides a gentle lift of energy without overdoing it like more caffeinated beverages. Hibiscus offers a refreshing sweet/sour flavor that benefits the liver and nourishes yin, and a beautiful red color, resonating with the Fire element of Summer. It is used in traditional medicines around the world to cool the body and improve hydration. I combine equal parts of both and make sun tea in a large mason jar.

Cantaloupe Agua Fresca: Aguas frescas (cool waters) are refreshing summer beverages made from fresh fruit, popular throughout Latin America and the Caribbean. They can easily be made without sugar for a sweet, refreshing taste of summer that doesn’t knock your spleen out and kick your blood sugar in the butt. Mix equal parts ripe cantaloupe and water in a blender and puree. A tiny pinch of salt will improve the hydrating effect and make it taste sweeter. Add a little bit of grated fresh ginger, especially if you tend towards digestive upset like gas and bloating.

Bonus recipe: try a tart and refreshing fruit shrub from my colleague Erin Wood L.Ac

All of these are delicious cool or at room temperature - but if you’d like a little accessible science to help share the wisdom of avoiding cold drinks on hot days, here’s an investigation from NPR that explains from an allopathic perspective why cold drinks make you hotter. A votre santé!

Angelica & Peony: Radiant Natural Health and Beauty products are created by an acupuncturist and herbalist. Contact me for samples and information about enhancing your practice with Angelica & Peony!

 

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5 Healthy Summer Skin Habits

I hope you enjoy this article - it features some Angelica & Peony skin care products, but as always, I include DIY alternatives. This went out to my subscribers last month - sign up here to get my monthly newsletter with articles like this, product specials and sales and interesting news in natural beauty and wellness. -Kirsten

A classical principle of Chinese medicine and many holistic systems is to be in harmony with our environment - what our body needs at midwinter is not the same as midsummer, in a tropical rainforest not the same as a windswept prairie, at 25 not the same as at 65! Approach your skin with this attitude and you'll be rewarded with happier, healthier skin.

Habit 1: Smart Hydration. If it's hotter you're sweating more, and if you're in a dry or windy climate, you'll be even more likely to need water. If you'd like some ideas of cooling drinks that are acupuncturist approved, check out this article I wrote last summer during a heat wave.

Habit 2: Cleansing with Oil. Smog, makeup, dust, sunblock... there's lots of reasons to want to wash your face in summer! The oil cleansing method uses natural oils to gently cleanse your skin while maintaining its natural balance and leaving it moisturized and soothed. Watch my video about how to use facial serums to cleanse and treat your skin. If you find your skin is more oily or acne prone during humid summer weather, or if a facial serum feels too oily in the heat, switch to this method and forgo separate moisturizing. I use 3-in-1 Serum during the summer, especially at the end of a grimy day, but you can also concoct your own oil blend as described in this great article about OCM.

Habit 3: Facials from the Farmers Market. Use seasonal produce to whip up some yummy face masks for your skin type: (follow any of these decadent treatments with an Angelica & Peony facial serum)

Nourishing Peach Mask for Dry & Mature Skin: puree peaches and add sesame oil. Apply to face for 5-10 minutes and then rinse clean.
Renewing Strawberry Mask for Dull Skin: mash fresh strawberries with yogurt and apply to face for 5 minutes before washing clean.

Join me at the Manzanita Collective open house July 16 where I'll be demo-ing farmers market facials in the afternoon!

Habit 4: Tea Treatments: Ease summertime issues like bug bites, allergies and sunburn with herbal washes aka cooled tea. Try chrysanthemum blossom to rinse itchy, irritated eyes, mint for itchy bites, and black tea to ease a sunburn. Make a cup or mason jar of tea, and let it cool completely before using.

Habit 5: Practice Safe Sun: Sun damage takes its toll over time, as well as increasing skin cancer risks. However sun exposure is vital to our health, both physical and emotional,and there's increasing understanding that our 'sun-phobia' has led to unexpected health problems, especially in Northern countries. Many experts recommend 10-15 minutes a day of sun on your bare skin, depending on where you are on the globe and your skin tone. This overview of the science and debates about sun exposure is a fascinating read, and has more information and guidance.

As always, treat your skin with love and respect, and consult a practitioner for any medical concerns (email me if you'd like help finding someone in your area.)

Shine on!

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